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Making Meaning of Shakespeare’s Title

“A sad tale’s best for winter,” asserts the young Sicilian prince Mamillius when asking for a bedtime story. Indeed, many of our bedtime fairy tales, myths, stories and legends have a dark undertone to them. Consider the collection of Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm’s Fairy Tales, originally published under the name Children’s and Household Tales in…

Clothes “Oft Proclaim the Man”

Robert Falls and Ana Kuzmanic's Shakespearean Collaboration Wardrobe certainly helps a performer get into character, and the costume an actor wears is equally important to the audience. This is especially true in contemporary productions of Shakespeare, where doublets and ermine-trimmed robes may not make an appearance, but power and status are almost always in play.…

The Winter’s Tale: Neither Comedy nor Tragedy

By 1611 at age 47, William Shakespeare had already penned most of the plays that would come to define his oeuvre. Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night and Othello had all premiered in London, along with 27 other plays. Though he could not have known how long-lasting his…

Reading, Pennsylvania: A Brief History

Lynn Nottage sets her play "Sweat" in Reading, Pennsylvania—a once-prosperous city 48 miles northwest of Philadelphia—captivated by its early 21st century economic struggles. Reading’s story, from its earliest pre-Revolutionary beginnings to its apex in the 1930s to its current state of economic decline, mirrors that of many cities across the nation that have undergone sweeping changes in their economic landscapes.

Two Decades of Drama

With nine productions over the past 20 years, Rebecca Gilman is the most-produced contemporary playwright in Goodman Theatre history. The Pulitzer Prize finalist, Artistic Associate and “one of Chicago’s hottest playwrights” (Chicago Tribune) marks her seventh world premiere at the Goodman with Twilight Bowl. 

Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out: Creation in San Francisco

The setting for How to Catch Creation is an imagined city by the Bay, described by playwright Christina Anderson in her script as “a place that resembles San Francisco and the surrounding areas.” So though the geography lives somewhere in-between fact and fiction, there is great inspiration, for a play about multiple meanings of “creation,”…

Snaps from Santaland

Not every trip to Santaland is instant holiday magic. Inspired by David Sedaris' The Santaland Diaries, playing November 30 - December 30 in the Goodman's Owen Theatre.  From errant elves and mischievous young ones to holiday picture drama trauma, we want to see your most memorable trip to Santaland. Share your personal Santaland snap with…

Solo Act: Linda Gehringer Takes Center Stage

Stage and screen star Linda Gehringer returns to the Owen Theatre, where she was last seen in Rebecca Gilman’s The Crowd You’re in With (a performance for which she earned a Joseph Jefferson Award nod). This time, she commands the stage as Helene, the central and sole character in Dael Orlandersmith’s new play.